WDMA Prop C

Muslims find new ways to celebrate holy day

by | Jul 31, 2020 | Latest

The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown a wrench in festivals, parties, concerts and more. But for many Americans, the cancellation of religious activities is perhaps the greatest inconvenience.

One of the most important Islamic holidays, Eid al-Adha, begins Friday, July 31. Normally it would entail large gatherings, going to mosque and serving the less fortunate.

This year, though, families have to find new, smaller ways to participate.

“On the day of Eid, we go and pray and basically distribute the meat among poor, friends, neighbors and relatives. And at night, we have a huge feast among family members where we all just come together and celebrate,” Wylie native Subul Khan, 24, explained. “But due to the pandemic, we won’t be doing that this year, sadly.”

Eid al-Adha commemorates the prophet Ibrahim (or Abraham when Anglicized)’s near-sacrifice of his son Isma’il (or Ishmael). The Qur’an describes how when Allah (God) commanded Ibrahim to sacrifice Isma’il to prove his faith, Ibrahim obeyed.

He took his son to Mina – in modern-day Saudi Arabia – to perform the deed, but when it came time to sacrifice Isma’il, he found that Allah had replaced him with either a ram or lamb, depending on the translation.

The same story is also told in the Jewish Torah and Christian Old Testament, though it’s Isaac that Ibrahim nearly sacrifices in those versions, not Isma’il.
For Eid al-Adha, Muslims take care of and sacrifice an animal. A third of the meat – usually lamb, goat, cow or camel – goes to the needy in town, a third goes to neighbors and friends, and a third stays with the family.

“We basically take care of the goat/cow, like feed it everyday and take care of it, and this way we get close to the animal,” Khan said. “But when the time comes to sacrifice it, we realize that we need to give it up in name of Allah and we know that in return we will receive a greater reward.”

Since not all Muslims have the means to raise and kill an animal at their homes, many turn to meat markets. This is the Khan family’s strategy; they place an order of their preferred animal in advance, and on Eid al-Adha, it’s killed at the meat shop and they pick it up.

In Pakistan, where they’re originally from, they would take care of a goat for the month before the holiday themselves. Khan moved to Wylie with her parents and older brother during her freshman year of high school.

She graduated from Wylie East in 2014 and University of Texas at Austin in 2018, where she’s currently in the Pharmaceutical Sciences graduate program.

Eid al-Adha also marks the end of Hajj, one of the five pillars of Islam. The pilgrimage, required by the Qur’an for all healthy adults with the means to travel to Mecca in Saudi Arabia, typically draws more than 2 million people. It was highly restricted this year to prevent further spread of COVID-19.

To mark the beginning of Eid al-Ahda, Muslims performing Hajj throw pebbles at nearby Mina, where Ibrahim is said to have thrown pebbles at the devil.

By Morgan Howard • [email protected]

0 Comments

Related News

Council holds several public meetings

Council holds several public meetings

Council held several public hearings and passed an ordinance prohibiting parking near the intersection of Cloudcroft Drive and South Ballard Avenue at the Jan. 11 regular meeting. Council first discussed the parking ordinance in November 2021 after residents living in...

read more
Wylie loses first district game to Sachse

Wylie loses first district game to Sachse

In the battle of the last two unbeaten teams in District 9-6A, the Wylie Pirates came up short.Wylie (5-1, 12-13) struggled out of the gates and lost 49-21 to the Sachse Lady Mustangs (6-0, 14-8). The Pirates fell behind 24-3 after the first quarter and couldn't...

read more
Wylie East rebounds with double-digit win

Wylie East rebounds with double-digit win

The Wylie East girls basketball team rebounded with a 55-44 victory over Sherman after the district defeat last week. The Lady Raiders (5-1, 13-8) started strong, leading 23-12 after the first quarter. Sherman battled back and cut the lead to eight points but couldn't...

read more
Election audit shows few issues

Election audit shows few issues

The Secretary of State’s office released the findings of Phase 1 of the forensics audit of the November 2020 election, which shows few issues with the process. In September 2021, the office of the Secretary of State (SOS) announced it would conduct a full forensic...

read more
WISD dedicates Williams Center

WISD dedicates Williams Center

There was action on and off the court Tuesday, Jan. 4 as the Williams Center was officially dedicated by Wylie ISD. The center was built with funds secured in the passage of the $193.7 million WISD bond in May 2019. Of the total bond amount, $87 million was used for...

read more
COVID-19 continues to surge

COVID-19 continues to surge

Health officials reported the highest single day COVID-19 case count last week with more than 1 million infections. A total of 1,082,549 new COVID-19 cases were reported Monday, Jan. 3, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. The large number of new...

read more
Dallas County opens additional testing sites

Dallas County opens additional testing sites

Amid a national testing shortage, Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS) will open four additional testing sites. The new facilities in Dallas County will be for anyone who needs a PCR COVID test. In addition to COVID tests, flu tests will be available at...

read more
County livestock show opens next week

County livestock show opens next week

Pigs, cattle, sheep and goats will parade around the show ring next week to be judged in the 2022 Collin County Junior Livestock Show and Sale. The event, which features entries from FFA and 4-H members throughout the county, is set for the week of Jan. 8-15 at the...

read more