Protect your heart health by getting vaccinated

by | Oct 18, 2017 | Life & Style

While getting vaccinated is important for people of all ages, it’s especially important for adults with heart disease. They are more likely to have serious complications from common diseases such as influenza (flu) or pneumonia that vaccination can help prevent.

Common diseases can become serious in adults with heart disease; they can even increase the risk of another heart attack. The protection that vaccines provide helps reduce these risks, and while adults may know they are at increased risk for a heart attack, they may not know they need vaccines throughout their lives to help protect them from serious illness.

Bill Zeigler, 70, didn’t realize he had coronary artery disease (CAD) until 2016, when he began to feel winded after regular exercise and went to his physician’s office for a stress test. It was there that he learned he had CAD, one of the most common forms of cardiovascular disease. After his diagnosis, he knew he had to make important lifestyle changes, including adopting a healthier diet and maintaining his exercise routine. And while Zeigler had stayed up-to-date with his flu vaccinations, his physician explained that getting these and catching up on his pneumococcal vaccinations was more important now than ever because of his diagnosis.

Vaccines are one of the safest and easiest ways to protect your health, even if you are taking prescription medications, say experts. Fortunately, getting a vaccination is easy — most doctors’ offices, health care centers and local pharmacies offer vaccines, and many are covered by health insurance.

If you have heart disease, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the following:

  • An annual flu vaccine to protect against seasonal flu.
  • Pneumococcal vaccine to protect against pneumococcal disease between the ages of 19 and 64. All adults will need additional doses once they turn 65.
  • Td and Tdap vaccines to protect against tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough.) Td is recommended every 10 years for all adults. Tdap vaccine adds protection against whooping cough. All adults need Tdap vaccine if they haven’t received a dose.
  • Zoster vaccine to protect against shingles, if you are 60 years or older.

Your healthcare professional may recommend other vaccines as well, based on factors such as your job, lifestyle and travel habits. Be sure to ask what vaccines you need.

“If I were to give advice to anyone else with cardiovascular disease, I would tell them to make sure to follow all the instructions given to them by their physicians, including getting vaccinated,” says Zeigler. “I make sure to get my flu vaccine every year, and any other vaccines that I’m due for.”

To learn more about recommended vaccines and find a location to get vaccinated near you, visit cdc.gov/vaccines/heart.

Getting vaccinated is an important step you can take to protect your health. Talk to your healthcare professional to make sure you have all the vaccines you need.

Source: StatePoint

For more stories like this subscribe to the print or e-edition.

0 Comments

Related News

Homeowner goes on a kitchen garden adventure

Homeowner goes on a kitchen garden adventure

After a few years of growing the typical Texas flowers; pan­sies in the winter, impatiens in the summer in the normal front flowerbeds, homeowner Kori Hendrix realized she wanted more variety and more gardens at her Wylie home. There was ample opportuni­ty to make...

read more
Artisan, inventor fuse marriage, creativity

Artisan, inventor fuse marriage, creativity

Sue Darte blames her daugh­ter and a jewelry making class she took nine years ago for ig­niting a passion for the art of fusing glass. “A retail glass company had a Groupon coupon and I brought my daughter-in-law with me to make two pieces of jewelry,” Sue said. In...

read more
Make Mother’s Day bloom

Make Mother’s Day bloom

Mother’s Day is just around the corner and if you’re fortunate enough to still have your mom or grandmother in your life why not plan a special trip to honor them this year? We all know flowers and lunch are nice but how about escaping town to visit a place where...

read more
Waste in the water

Waste in the water

Pictures of trash on beaches, a whale found with a belly full of garbage and turtles with plastic straws up their nose are no laugh­ing matter. They are all just a tiny snapshot of reality today. The impact of the world’s overuse of plastic is causing hav­oc on the...

read more
Best of balloting now open

Best of balloting now open

Shop local. Eat local. Drink local. Now cast your ballot and Vote local. Voting for the annual Best of Wylie contest is now open and will continue through the end of the month. Whether you’ve lived in the Wylie area one year or 10 years, we know you’ve cultivated a...

read more
Sisters on the Fly celebrates 21 years of adventure

Sisters on the Fly celebrates 21 years of adventure

Imagine being part of a group where only women are allowed. No kids, no husband, no pets. Your only responsibili­ty is for yourself – and making sure you have fun! Sure, there’s a caveat. You must be willing to commune with nature as you fraternize with a group of...

read more
Safety steps for spooky fun

Safety steps for spooky fun

Traditional family activities like trick-or-treating create fun moments and memories, but the effects of COVID-19 on this Halloween will bring about change for the spooky excite­ment. You can still ensure a special night for your little ones and all the ghouls,...

read more
Try a new way to travel

Try a new way to travel

Despite the COVID-19 pan­demic, families are still finding ways to make the most of un­usual schedules to plan a get­away. With more flexible work and school arrangements, many families are embracing the idea of a “flexcation,” an emerging travel trend where families...

read more